Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)

TROPICAL SOIL CARBON STOCKS IN RELATION TO FALLOW AGE AND SOIL DEPTH

Author archives:

mjsa.01.2020.37.41

ABSTRACT

TROPICAL SOIL CARBON STOCKS IN RELATION TO FALLOW AGE AND SOIL DEPTH

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Ahukaemere CM, Okoli NH, Aririguzo BN and Onwudike SU

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.01.2020.37.41

The interest in Soil carbon has risen significantly in the science community due to the potential of climate change mitigation through soil carbon sequestration. Changes in fallow periods influence how much and at what rate carbon is sequestered in or released from the soil. Carbon sequestration in soils under three different fallow ages (7, 14 and 21) at varying sampling depths (0-20, 20-40, 40-60, 60-80, 80-100 cm) was investigated using the method of Batjes and data obtained were subjected to analysis of variance. Organic carbon content was generally low ranging from 3.99 – 5.67g kg-1. Soil carbon sequestered under the three varying fallow ages ranged from 1295 – 1611g cm-2. Though no significant variation was observed in the amount of C sequestered by the varying ages of vegetation, results showed that 14 years fallow sequestered the highest quantity of carbon (1611g cm-2) while the least (1295 g cm-2) was obtained in 7 year fallow. On the other hand, sampling depth had a significant influence on soil carbon content. In 7 years fallow period, 0-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm sampling depths contained significantly highest carbon stock values. In 14 and 21 years fallow ages, 0-20 cm sampling depth sequestered significantly highest carbon (3147.04 g cm-2, 2247 g cm-2) compared to other sampling depths. Conclusively, more carbon is sequestered at the soil surface than in the sub-soil and prolonged fallow age up to 21 years may not be beneficial to soil carbon sequestration.
Pages 37-41
Year 2020
Issue 1
Volume 4

Download

Posted by din

mjsa.01.2020.31.36

ABSTRACT

EFFECT OF DIFFERENT METHODS OF CROP ESTABLISHMENT ON GROWTH AND YIELD OF A SPRING RICE AT JANAKPURDHAM-17, DHANUSHA

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Santosh Bhandari, Saroj Sapkota, Chetan Gyawali

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.01.2020.31.36

The study was conducted to know and evaluate the performance of different methods of crop establishment of Hardinath-1, spring rice, under RCBD with 5 treatments and 4 replications; treatments used were- Open, straight row, SRI, random and dry bed method of transplanting. The parameters like number of tillers per square meter, plant height, panicle length, effective number of tillers per square meter, thousand grain weight, grain yield in MT/ha and sterility percentage were accounted for the study. The findings suggest statistical similarity in grain yield for SRI (4.475 Mt/ha), straight row (4.45 Mt/ha) and open method of transplanting (4.45 Mt/ha), although the former, literally, being a slight superior among three. Random (20.00a) and dry bed (19.64a) method of transplanting were statistically at par and highest in value for sterility percentage followed by open (17.68b), SRI (16.73bc) and straight row (16.12c) method, the least of all. SRI method of transplanting exhibited highest mean value for number of tillers/m2 (294.4), thousand grain weight (22.87a), effective number of tillers/m2 (254.8a), grain yield (4.475 t/ha) and second lowest sterility percentage and plant height after straight row method of transplanting. Straight row method of transplanting exhibited highest mean value for plant height (39.36 cm, 43.02 cm, 43.91 cm and 102.28 cm) and lowest sterility percentage (16.12c) but, showed comparatively poor performance in other parameters in respect to SRI method of transplanting. Dry bed method, as a whole, comparatively exhibited the worst performance of all and thus, categorized as control treatment. This study suggests that SRI method of crop establishment is an easy and effective technique for improving physiological and yield attributing characters of spring rice.
Pages 31-36
Year 2020
Issue 1
Volume 4

Download

Posted by din

mjsa.01.2020.25.26

ABSTRACT

RESPONSE OF GROWTH REGULATOR TO GROUNDNUT IN CHARLAND AREA

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Jubaidur Rahman, Mukaddasul Islam Riad

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.01.2020.25.26

The experiment was conducted at the charland area of Jamalpur during rabi 2017-18 and 2018-19 to find out the suitable growth regulator for groundnut in char land. Treatments included in the experiment were: Flora (Nitrobenzene, ACI), Nafa (Entefa), Maxsulphar (Sulfer-80%, Mcdonald), Alba (Avamectin-1.8 EC, SAMP Limited), Calsol and Control (without growth regulator). Growth regulator were applied Flora (2 ml/L), Nafa (2.5 ml/L), Maxsulphar (2 ml/L), Alba (0.5 ml/L), Calsol (3 ml/L) as foliar spray at 35 and 45 days after sowing (DAS). Several yield parameters e.g. plant height, number of pod/plant, number of effective pod/plant, number of uneffective pod/plant, root length, 100 seed wt. and yield were analyzed. Growth regulators effective to groundnut in charland area from Flora, Nafa, Maxsulphar and Alba application due to formation of nodulation, chlorophyll synthesis and supply of plant growth agent. Control treatment performs better than some growth regulator treatments.
Pages 25-26
Year 2020
Issue 1
Volume 4

Download

Posted by din

mjsa.01.2020.22.24

ABSTRACT

AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF ANTHROPOGENIC CLIMATE CHANGE ON RICE PRODUCTION IN MALAYSIA

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Wen Chiat Lee, Nicholas Hoe, K. Kuperan Viswanathan, Amir Hussin Baharuddin/span>

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.01.2020.22.24

Rice is an important staple food in Malaysia and represents a substantial household expenditure. Malaysia, which imports about 35 percent of its rice, is the 13th largest importer of rice in the world. This makes Malaysia susceptible to global rice crisis, similar to the one in 2008. Climate change is crucial in affecting rice production in tropical countries especially Malaysia as climate projections have shown that climate change will affect countries in the tropics most negatively with increased temperature and flooding due to anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions. This study analysed the effect of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions on rice production in Malaysia during the period 1970-2013. The analysis incorporated the following variables: total local rice production, carbon dioxide emissions, precipitation, land used for paddy farming, total rice imports, and global average crude oil prices. The results indicated that in the estimated model the level of carbon dioxide does not affect rice production in the short-run. However, increased carbon dioxide emissions can influence rice production indirectly by affecting the level of precipitation. Precipitation and area of irrigated land are significant variables in determining level of rice production. Policies for reducing carbon emissions is however crucial for ensuring long run sustainability in rice production.
Pages 22-24
Year 2020
Issue 1
Volume 4

Download

Posted by din

mjsa.01.2020.14.18

ABSTRACT

A REVIEW ON VARIOUS MANAGEMENT METHOD OF RICE BLAST DISEASE

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Swodesh Rijal, Yuvraj Devkota

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.01.2020.14.18

Rice (Oryza sativa) is native to Asia and grown worldwide. Rice feeds more than 50 % of the world population Rice is predominant staple food for 17 countries in Asia and provides 20 % of world’s dietary energy supply. So, among cereal it considered as most significant crop. Both biotic and a-biotic factors adversely affect crop and yield. Among them, 70 to 80 % of annual rice yield is lost due to blast disease. Higher statical data of blast disease is threat to growing population on food security. The objective of this review is to know the different methods of controlling blast diseases. Management of blast can be done through various methods but eco-friendly, integration of various cultural, Nutrient, chemical biological and botanical is best. Recent Research has been made in biological, botanical, Resistance development and Nutritional management but development of variety and Biological are best option. Isoprothiolane at 1.5 ml/l and Tricyclazole 22 % + Hexaconazole 3% SC (thrice from booting stage at weekly interval) are best chemical whereas Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Pf1 @ 10g/kg, SPM5C-1 and SPM5C-2 (aliphatic compounds obtained from Streptomyces sp), Bacillus tequilensis (GYLH001) and pseudomonad EA105 effectively inhibit the growth of M. oryzae. more than 100 R gene are identified as Resistance in Blast. Gene Pyramiding and use of multilines varieties is efficient and able to overcome pesticide hazards. Neem extract 4ml/15ml, Coffee arabica@25%, Nicotiana tabacum@10% are effective but garlic extract @higher doses and neem extract @ 4ml/15 ml are best for complete control. 4 g Si/L in green house condition observed greatest reduction of blast incidence. Several forecasting model predicts probable disease outbreak and reduces crop losses. Similarly, burning of residues and flooding make unfavorable condition to pathogen.
Pages 14-18
Year 2020
Issue 1
Volume 4

Download

Posted by din

mjsa.01.2020.05.08

ABSTRACT

EFFECT OF CO-COMPOST MADE FROM CATTLE MANURE AND SAWDUST ON THE GROWTH AND YIELD OF OKRA (ABELMOSCHUS ESCULENTUS L.)

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Asma Khatun, S. Sikder and J.C. Joardar

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.01.2020.05.08

Co-composting is an effective and environment friendly method of solid waste management to make valuable organic soil amendment which helps to maintain soil fertility in a sustainable way. An experiment was conducted to make co-compost using cattle manure (CM) and sawdust (SD) in different ratios (w/w) for the correct mixing proportion of raw materials to investigate the nutrient status of co-compost, and to evaluate the potential value of co-compost after incorporation into soil to form a nutrient rich growth media for Abelmoschus esculentus L. The experiment was laid out in a Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with five treatments and three replications comprising of only SD, only CM, sawdust-cattle manure mixture in the ratio of 1:1 (SD: CM=1:1), 1:2 (SD: CM= 1:2) and 2:1 (SD: CM= 2:1) by weight. Compost samples were collected for nutrient analysis after 75 days of composting. The highest value of total N, P and S were obtained in CM compost. Organic carbon (OC) and C:N ratio were found higher in SD compost. Higher growth and yield of okra were recorded under SD:CM= 1:2 treatment. On the basis of the experimental results, combined application of SD and CM at 1:2 ratio was the right mixing proportion. So, the organic fertilizer mixed with SD and CM at 1:2 ratio would be an efficient soil amendment that would improve soil quality, promote plant growth and increase yield.
Pages 05-08
Year 2020
Issue 1
Volume 4

Download

Posted by din

mjsa.02.2019.56.59

ABSTRACT

A CASE STUDY ON SOIL FERTILITY STATUS AND MAIZE PRODUCTIVITY IN DANG DISTRICT, NEPAL

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Barali Sunaina, Jha Ritesh Kumar, Karn Rupak, Regmi Mahesh

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.02.2019.56.59

The study was conducted to know the soil fertility status and maize productivity along with soil management practices being adopted in Lamahi municipality and Rapti rural municipality of Dang district to have a basis for the understanding of possible management options for better soil fertility and productivity. 333 soil samples from different maize farmers’ field were tested for soil fertility parameters during the program in which 60 soil samples were also collected from maize fields. Next, crop and soil management survey was carried out through a household interview in the sampled field. These data were used to identify the range of critical soil-test concentrations of nutrients and to assess the production status of maize and the soil management practices in farmers filed and evaluate the current fertilizer practices of farmers. The result showed that there was a dominance of neutral-alkaline soils with low organic matter & nitrogen levels with high P and medium K. Similarly, maize productivity of the district was found to be 3.3 ton per hectare. It is found that most farmers were adopting traditional crop management practices for maize cultivation with a high dependency on chemical fertilizers for fertilization.
Pages 56-59
Year 2019
Issue 2
Volume 3

Download

Posted by din

mjsa.02.2019.35.45

ABSTRACT

IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON FARMERS IN THE TALENSI DISTRICT OF THE UPPER EAST REGION OF GHANA

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Damian Felladam Tangonyire

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.02.2019.35.45

This paper focuses on the impact of climate change on the lives of rural farmers in the Pwalugu and Balungu communities of the Upper East Region of Ghana since farmers all over the country have been exposed to various adaptation strategies to climate change. From the study which was conducted in 2017, it was revealed that climate change affected respondents negatively resulting in reduced income level, inability to afford three square meals daily, inability to meet their health needs, inability to meet the educational needs of their children as well as inability to save at bank. Also, lack of finance, land tenure, norms/customs, lack of storage facilities, lack of ready markets, damage to crops by Fulani cattle and difficulty in obtaining seeds for farming were some challenges militating against the adoption of other adaptive strategies to climate change. The farmers therefore practiced crop diversification, adjustment in planting date of their crops, irrigation, change method of pr oduction, migration to the southern part of the country during the dry season to work, trading, fishing, among others as their specific adaptive strategies to climate change. The study recommends that, education should be one of the areas for policy intervention by government/stakeholders since access to education is vital in developing specific strategies of rural farmers to the diverse drivers and impacts of climate change on their lives.
Pages 35-45
Year 2019
Issue 2
Volume 3

Download

Posted by din

mjsa.01.2019.44.48

ABSTRACT

ALLELOPATHIC EFFECTS, YIELDS AND QUALITATIVE PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING OF ROOT EXUDATES OF FIVE WEED SPECIES

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Pervin Akter, Barat Sultana

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.01.2019.44.48

This research investigated the allelopathic effects, the yields and qualitative phytochemical screening of the water extract of root exudates of five weed species i.e. Cyperus rotundus L. (T1), Marselia quadrifolia L. (T2), Ludwigia hyssopifolia (G. Don) Exell, (T3) Pistia stratiotes L. (T4) and Colocasia esculenta L. (T5). The allelopathic tests of root exudates on five weed species showed that all the extracts had the pronounced inhibitory effect on cowpea and mungbean (tested crops). The yields of root exudates of the selected weed species varied. Root exudate of T3 showed the highest yield whereby T1 contained the lowest one. A preliminary phytochemical test showed the positive result of alkaloids, flavonoids, phenols and carbohydrates whereas proteins, amino acids, tannins, saponins, have been found to be absent in the root exudates of tested weeds. The results evidenced that these mentioned weeds contain compounds in their root exudates which may cause allelopathic effects on both tested crops.
Pages 44-48
Year 2019
Issue 1
Volume 3

Download

Posted by din

mjsa.01.2019.39.43

ABSTRACT

ROOFTOP FARMING: AN ALTERNATIVE TO CONVENTIONAL FARMING FOR URBAN SUSTAINABILITY

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Jha Ritesh Kumar, Bhattarai Natasha, KC Suraj, Shrestha Arjun Kumar, Kadariya Manahar

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.01.2019.39.43

In ecological terms, modern cities consume 75% of world resources with 2% of global land area and have become a parasite and a resource sink. Unmanaged planning and rapid development often result in the destruction of natural resources and loss of greenery. Pokhara is rapidly urbanizing into a megacity in Nepal and climate change caused by global warming is a great menace here. To support the rising requirement of quality food for the skyrocketing population, the main consumption centre should be mobilized for food production. Rooftop gardens are gaining relevance as they have the potential to meet the growing demand for food in cities and enhance the ecosystem along with the conservation of biodiversity. Thus, the addition of greenery element such as a green roof is becoming a trend to solve this problem in Pokhara. Establishment of green roofs in Pokhara city is arousing the interest of the government and public due to their demonstrated environmental benefits. The objective of this research is to inspect the existing practice and obstacles in rooftop farming that is faced by pr actitioners. Nagdhungha and Birauta are the areas of research here. Two practitioners are interviewed and sixty nonpractitioners are surveyed. The result shows that rooftop farming can benefit the environment by greatly reducing carbon in the atmosphere and can assist urban areas by reducing stormwater management cost. Furthermore, the paper demonstrates that the willingness to practice rooftop farming is high among urban dwellers and for future scope, some recommendations are provided in this research.
Pages 39-43
Year 2019
Issue 1
Volume 3

Download

Posted by din