Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)

ROOFTOP FARMING: AN ALTERNATIVE TO CONVENTIONAL FARMING FOR URBAN SUSTAINABILITY

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mjsa.01.2019.39.43

ABSTRACT

ROOFTOP FARMING: AN ALTERNATIVE TO CONVENTIONAL FARMING FOR URBAN SUSTAINABILITY

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Jha Ritesh Kumar, Bhattarai Natasha, KC Suraj, Shrestha Arjun Kumar, Kadariya Manahar

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.01.2019.39.43

In ecological terms, modern cities consume 75% of world resources with 2% of global land area and have become a parasite and a resource sink. Unmanaged planning and rapid development often result in the destruction of natural resources and loss of greenery. Pokhara is rapidly urbanizing into a megacity in Nepal and climate change caused by global warming is a great menace here. To support the rising requirement of quality food for the skyrocketing population, the main consumption centre should be mobilized for food production. Rooftop gardens are gaining relevance as they have the potential to meet the growing demand for food in cities and enhance the ecosystem along with the conservation of biodiversity. Thus, the addition of greenery element such as a green roof is becoming a trend to solve this problem in Pokhara. Establishment of green roofs in Pokhara city is arousing the interest of the government and public due to their demonstrated environmental benefits. The objective of this research is to inspect the existing practice and obstacles in rooftop farming that is faced by pr actitioners. Nagdhungha and Birauta are the areas of research here. Two practitioners are interviewed and sixty nonpractitioners are surveyed. The result shows that rooftop farming can benefit the environment by greatly reducing carbon in the atmosphere and can assist urban areas by reducing stormwater management cost. Furthermore, the paper demonstrates that the willingness to practice rooftop farming is high among urban dwellers and for future scope, some recommendations are provided in this research.
Pages 39-43
Year 2019
Issue 1
Volume 3

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mjsa.02.2019.31.34

ABSTRACT

STUDY ON THE STATUS OF ROOF TOP GARDENING IN SELECTED RESIDENTIAL AREAS OF DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Mahmuda Islam, Abdullah Al Nayeem, Ahmad Kamruzzaman Majumder, Khandokar Tanjim Elahi

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.02.2019.31.34

The rapid increment of low and middle-income consumers is exerting pressure on the food supply in urban areas. The objective of the study was to identify the present status of rooftop gardening. The study was conducted in the 4 selected residential areas of Dhaka city through plot to plot interview by using questionnaire. Land use nature is divided into four categories like residential, commercial, educational and mixed. Field survey was conducted on 1376 buildings in Dhanmondi, 391 buildings in Lalmatia, 272 buildings in Mohakhali Defense Officers Housing Society (DOHS) and 697 buildings in Uttara 13 no. Sector. Study found that, 39.1%, 59.2%, 36.6 % and 22.2% buildings have rooftop gardening in those selected locations respectively. The study reveals that, nearly one-third of the buildings (36.4%) contain rooftop gardening which basically depends on the aesthetic sense and moral values of individuals. Government should appreciate initiatives and consider proper planning policy to motivate citizen of the urban areas for planting fruit plants and vegetable in their roof. RTG system may also contribute to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The proposed study identifies the need for long-term policy measures for rooftop gardening that can become the basis for a sustainable approach for urban agriculture.
Pages 31-34
Year 2019
Issue 2
Volume 3

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mjsa.02.2019.27.30

ABSTRACT

GENETIC VARIANCE AND PERFORMANCE OF SESAME MUTANTS FOR YIELD CONTRIBUTING CHARACTERS

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Md. Saikat Hossain Bhuiyan, Dr. M. A. Malek, Md. Mohsin Ali Sarkar, Majharul Islam, Md. Wasim Akram

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.02.2019.27.30

In Bangladesh average sesame production is lower than other sesame producing country of the world, Therefore an experiment was conducted using five sesame M5 mutants along with the mother variety to observe their performances regarding seed yield and other yield attributes. Analysis of variance showed highly significant variations among the mutants and check for most of the characters. The mutant SM-07 required the shortest maturity period and produced the tallest plant and highest number of capsules plant-1 in each location and combined over locations, where as SM-01 and the mother variety Binatil-1 required the longest maturity period. Results over different locations also showed that the three mutants SM-06, SM-04 and SM-07 produced significantly higher seed yield (1477, 1449 and 1438 kg ha-1, respectively) which was 7.3, 5.2 and 4.4% higher than the mother variety Binatil-1 with seed yield of 1377 kg ha-1. This suggests that mutation techniques can be fruitfully applied to develop variety with higher seed yield and other improved agronomic traits of sesame.
Pages 27-30
Year 2019
Issue 2
Volume 3

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mjsa.02.2019.20.26

ABSTRACT

PHENOTYPIC DIVERSITY OF FINGER MILLET (Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn.) GENOTYPES

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Manoj Kandel, Narayan Bhadhur Dhami, Jiban Shrestha

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.02.2019.20.26

An experiment was conducted at Hill Crops Research Program (HCRP), Kabre, Dolakha under Nepal Agricultural Research Council, Nepal (NARC), during rainy season of 2018 with objective to identify the level of genetic difference present in the finger millet genotypes being cultivated for selecting genotypes in different agroclimatic region in Nepal using descriptive statistics, correlation analysis, cluster analysis and principle component analysis. P value of REML procedure revealed that significant variation was observed in 16 finger millet genotypes for baring head, days to 50% flowering, days to 50 % heading, days to 75 % maturity, finger length, flag leaf length, plant stand, plant height, number of finger, peduncle length, no of productive tiller, thousand grain weight, grain yield and straw yield showed selection and development of suitable varieties for different agro-climatic region of Nepal. Traits baring head, finger length, number of finger, flag leaf length, peduncle length, productive tiller, thousand kernel weight, plant stand, straw yield were positively correlated with grain yield revealed that se lection within this is importance for improvement grain yield. Cluster I consists up six early mature genotypes named as KLE-178,GE-0383, ACC#6022,GE-0382,KLE-0150,ACC#0124 can be used to development of early mature genotypes for mountain regions where chilling stress occurs at maturity period whereas similarly cluster II, III and IV consisted up 10 late mature genotypes named as ACC#2843, ACC#2860, ACC#8827-1,Sailung- Kodo-1,NE-1703-34,KLE-236,ACC#2311,GE-0356, farmer’s variety, GE-0480 can be used to develop high yielding late mature varieties for mid hill and terai regions these genotypes may be of interest to researcher for selection of materials for breeding program in different agro-climatic region of Nepal.
Pages 20-26
Year 2019
Issue 2
Volume 3

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mjsa.02.2019.16.19

ABSTRACT

INTERCROPPING OF POTATO WITH BRINJAL

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Jubaidur Rahman, Monira Yasmin, Fouzia Sultana Shikha, Majharul Islam, Mukaddasul Islam Riad

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.02.2019.16.19

A field experiment was conducted to find out the spacing of potato – brinjal intercropping system and land utilization and economic return at the Regional Agricultural Research Station, Jamalpur during rabi 2017-2018. The experiment was laid out in randomized complete block design (RCBD) with three (3) replications and six treatments. Cultivation of potato with brinjal at potato (60 cm × 25 cm) + brinjal (120 cm × 75 cm), Potato (50 cm × 20 cm) + Brinjal (100 cm × 70 cm), Potato (50 cm × 20 cm) + Brinjal (100 cm × 75 cm) might be agronomically feasible and economically profitable for potato and brinjal intercropping system as compared to sole treatment. Potato (50 cm × 20 cm) + Brinjal (100 cm × 70 cm) best performed in gross return, gross margin and potato equivalent yield (PEY 49.14 tha-1) compared with the other treatments. The total yield of intercropped crops was greater than sole cropping, shown by LER>1. The overall advantage of intercropping ranged from 73 to 92%. The hi ghest land equivalent value of 92% was recorded for Potato (50 cm × 20 cm) + Brinjal (100 cm × 70 cm) arrangements indicated a yield advantage of 92% over sole crop. Viable agronomic option in increasing land use efficiency and increased food security. It is, therefore, imperative to demonstrate the best treatment under farmer’s condition.
Pages 16-19
Year 2019
Issue 2
Volume 3

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mjsa.02.2019.05.15

ABSTRACT

VOLATILE ESTERS AND SULFUR COMPOUNDS IN DURIANS & A SUGGESTED APPROACH TO ENHANCING ECONOMIC VALUE OF DURIANS

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Joycelyn Soo Mun Peng

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.02.2019.05.15

Durio zibethinus, more commonly known as Durian or the ‘king of fruits’ by locals is a Southeast Asian tropical fruit. Smell is a crucial factor in durian acceptance amongst consumers as many are unable to accept the pungent onion-like odour liberated by durians. Due to the controversial aroma of durians, chemical compounds reportedly contributing to the durian smell- volatile esters and sulfur compounds have been widely discussed in the literature. This review article seeks to consolidate the literature which have identified volatile esters and sulfur-containing compounds in durians from Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand, and studies shedding light on how the economic value of durians can be enhanced. Literature review was conducted using databases Scopus and ScienceDirect and a total of 18 articles were reviewed. In light of the rising demand for durians, factors, namely aroma, flavour and colour, in which consumers consider in the purchase of durians are further looked at, to explore the potential of enhancing favourable traits of durians and increasing its economic value and sales in the global market. By knowing the chemical compounds involved or influencing each factor, further studies can be conducted to explore methods such as breeding of new durian cultivars and metabolic or gene modification for phenotypic manifestation of favourable traits attractive to consumers.
Pages 05-15
Year 2019
Issue 2
Volume 3

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mjsa.02.2019.01.04

ABSTRACT

STUDY ON THE ROOTING OF PICEA ABIES CUTTINGS UNDER AUXINS, SUBSTRATES AND BOTTOM HEAT

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Shahram Sedaghathoor, Somayeh Abdizadeh Sarem

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.02.2019.01.04

The effect of rooting hormones, substrate and bottom heat was studied on the rooting of the cuttings of Picea abies. The treatments included bottom heat at two levels, hormones at six levels and rooting substrate at three levels. The recorded traits included rooting percentage, the number of roots; root length and root dry weight. It was found that the applied hormones had no considerable effect on rooting and the recorded traits, so that the application of 2000 and 4000 mg/l IBA had no significant difference with no-hormone application on all three substrates with or without the use of bottom heat. Cuttings treated with NAA produced no roots in any of the studied three substrates. The highest number of roots was produced under the treatment of sand + perlite × 4000 mg/l IBA × no-bottom heat. The treatment of no-bottom heat × no-hormone × perlite produced the longest root. The highest root dry weight was devoted the treatments of no-bottom heat × no-hormone × sand and no-bottom heat × 2000 mg/l IBA× sand.
Pages 01-04
Year 2019
Issue 2
Volume 3

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mjsa.01.2019.23.27

ABSTRACT

MICROBIAL POPULATION CHANGES IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF TOMATO SOLANUM LYCOPERSICUM VARIETIES DURING EARLY GROWTH IN GREENHOUSE

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Chinakwe EC, Ibekwe VI, Nwogwugwu UN, Onyemekara NN, Ofoegbu J, Mike-Anosike E, Emeakaraoha M, Adeleye S, Chinakwe

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.01.2019.23.27

The microbial population changes in the rhizosphere of two varieties of tomato: cherry and plum were studied. They were grown in a greenhouse for five weeks. Standard microbiological procedures were applied. Biochemical and cultural characteristics revealed the presence of Bacillus, Enterococcus, Staphylococcus, Rhizobium as bacterial species and Penicillium, Mucor and Saccharomyces as fungal species. Total Heterotrophic Bacterial Counts (THBC) ranged from 1.0 x 106 to 4.8 x 107 cfu/g; 7.0 x 107 to 4.5 x 109 cfu/g and 5.4 x 107 to 3.0 x 109 cfu/g for bare soil, rhizosphere soil of cherry tomato and rhizosphere soil of plum tomato respectively. Total Fungal Counts (TFC) were lower and ranged from 1.3 x 106 to 6.5 x 106 cfu/g, 1.2 x 106 to 8.7 x 106 cfu/g and 1.0 x 106 to 1.2 x 106 cfu/g for bare soil, rhizosphere soil of cherry tomato and rhizosphere soil of plum tomato respectively. The microbial succession pattern further revealed that Bacillus sp, Enterococcus sp, Rhizobium sp, Mucor sp and Saccharomyces sp were the predominant microorganisms present in bare soil and rhizosphere soils of cherry and plum tomatoes. The presence of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria e.g. Bacillus sp and Rhizobium sp, is of great advantage to the early growth of tomato plants as they play important roles in increasing soil fertility, plant growth , and suppression of phytopathogens for healthy plant development and sustainable agriculture.
Pages 23-27
Year 2019
Issue 1
Volume 3

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mjsa.01.2019.20.22

ABSTRACT

EVALUATION OF PLANT GROWTH PROMOTING POTENTIALS EXHIBITED BY RHIZOBACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH BEANS PLANT

Journal: Malaysian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture (MJSA)
Author: Chinakwe EC, Ibekwe VI, Nwogwugwu UN, Ofoegbu J, Mike-Anosike E, Nwachukwu IN, Adeleye S, Chinakwe PO

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/mjsa.01.2019.20.22

Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) isolated from the rhizosphere of velvet Beans plant grown on the agricultural research farmland of Federal University of Technology, Owerri, were evaluated for their growth promoting potentials. The four isolates: Micrococcus sp, Bacillus sp, Corynebacterium sp, and Enterococcus sp, were evaluated for plant growth promoting abilities, such as phosphate solubilization, indole acetic acid (IAA), ammonia (NH3), and Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) production. Micrococcus sp, Bacillus sp, and Enterococcus sp produced IAA, while Corynebacterium sp, and also Bacillus sp and Enterococus sp solubilized phosphate. All the isolates were able to produce HCN and NH3. Rhizobacteria associated with beans plant constitute important sources of potentially beneficial microorganisms with plant growth promoting activity or antagonistic effects against phytopathogens. The results obtained in this study suggests that these rhizobacteria possess multiple plant growth promoting attributes which can be applied as biofertilizers or as biocontrol agents in agriculture, to improve plant growth and productivity.
Pages 20-22
Year 2019
Issue 1
Volume 3

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